A Brief Overview of Equal Employment Opportunity Laws

 

EEOC pic

EEOC
Image: EEOC.gov

An MBA graduate of the Columbia Business School, Steven Darien serves as the chief executive officer and chairman of the Cabot Advisory Group. Steven Darien relies on more than 30 years of human resources experience to help his clients improve their business operations.

One human resource issue that many professionals encounter is equal employment opportunity (EEO) violations. According to EEO laws, employers are forbidden from discriminating against a candidate based on the person’s disability, sex, age, nationality, race, political affiliation, religion, and pregnancy status.

Depending on the state, it may also be illegal for employers to discriminate based on sexual orientation. Violations of EEO laws can occur at any point during the job hiring process and term of employment.

For example, job advertisements cannot show a preference for someone of a particular race, sex, religion, or another protected group. Similarly, these advertisements cannot discourage any candidates from applying based on any of these identifications.

The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for handling EEO violations. Persons who believe that an equal employment violation has occurred must file a complaint with the EEOC to start an investigation. The EEOC then has the ability to subject an employer to investigations and sanctions. Consequences of EEO violations are also administered at the discretion of the EEOC, such as removing employers from their positions.

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