Rutgers’ Three Hundred Years of Expansion and Excellence

 

Rutgers pic

Rutgers
Image: rutgers.edu

Steven M. Darien heads the team at the Cabot Advisory Group, LLC, a strategy-focused human resources consulting firm dedicated to assisting clients in succession planning, executive development, communications, and other vital activities. An honors graduate of the economics program at Rutgers University, Steven M. Darien has built up three decades of experience in his field. He serves as member of the Rutgers board of trustees.

As the state university for New Jersey, Rutgers continues to hold a place among the leading institutions of higher learning in the country. One of only nine colleges to be established in pre-Revolutionary America, the school was founded by the Dutch Reformed Church and originally named Queen’s College. In 1825, it honored Colonel Henry Rutgers for his charitable gifts by bestowing his name on its campus.

During the time of the Civil War, Rutgers was designated New Jersey’s land-grant college, meaning that it would thenceforth be able to offer higher education to a wider range of students. After the First World War, the school opened its doors to women as well.

By the middle of the 20th century, Rutgers’ configurations had become largely what they are today, with the main college absorbing the College of South Jersey and Newark University and taking on the mantle of a state university.

Today, Rutgers’ total student body stands at about 50,000. Its campuses continue to offer innovative programs in fields as diverse as liberal arts and engineering, business and pharmacy.

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Notable Alumni of Rutgers University

 

George McLaughlin pic

George McLaughlin, DMD
Image: news.rutgers.edu

A leader in human resources and performance enhancement, Steven M. Darien serves as the chairman and CEO of the Cabot Advisory Group. Steven M. Darien earned his undergraduate degree in economics from Rutgers University and has remained active with his alma mater ever since. Among other endeavors, he has chaired the Rutgers University Foundation’s Corporate Development Committee since 2009.

Founded in 1766, Rutgers University recently celebrated its 250th anniversary. Over the course of its history, the university has produced graduates who have made a difference in their communities and the world. A few notable alumni include the following:

1. George McLaughlin. A graduate of the School of Dental Medicine, George McLaughlin was one of the students who participated in the lunch counter sit-ins in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1960. McLaughlin showed up to support the famous Greensboro Four, a group of African Americans who refused to leave a segregated lunch counter at a Woolworths store.

2. Bill Rasmussen. After earning an MBA from Rutgers, Bill Rasmussen created ESPN, the first 24-hour sports television network in 1979. Thanks to Rasmussen, millions of viewers enjoy coverage of sporting events such as March Madness and the College World Series.

3. Michael Gottlieb. Michael Gottlieb studied biological sciences at Rutgers and went on to investigate a rare form of pneumonia he noticed in a group of men in the Los Angeles gay community. Suspecting that the cause was a virus, he submitted a report of his discovery to the Centers for Disease Control, which confirmed two years later that the virus was what we now know as HIV (human immunodeficiency virus).

Summer Classes Teach Theatre Arts at the George Street Playhouse

Based in Bridgewater, New Jersey, Steven M. Darien, the chairman and chief executive officer of the Cabot Advisory Group, LLC, collaborates with organizations on succession preparation, human resources software, and strategic planning. Outside of his work life, Steven M. Darien also serves industry groups and non-profits, such as the George Street Playhouse in Bridgewater.

In addition to a regular season, the George Street Playhouse sponsors the Summer Theatre Academy for ages 5-18. This encourages students’ natural talents of self-expression in an enjoyable, captivating situation. A 12:1 student-teacher ratio assures individual attention. At the end of each two- or four-week course, participants will present their work on the theatre’s main stage. Classes run from June 30-July 25.

In one class for five- to 8-year-olds, students will learn to use songs to tell stories and play theatrical games. Another group will develop a classic story into a play by creating costumes and offering ideas on set construction. Students aged 9 to 12 will enhance their musical talents as they produce The Wizard of Oz. Another troupe will practice collaborative skills as they rehearse a drama. Meanwhile, actors aged 13 to 18 will hone their stagecraft as they focus on improvisation and developing characters. The other 13-18 group will work with playwrights, choreographers, and composers to stage an original production.