How to Tread Water Effectively

Tread Water pic

Tread Water
Image: livestrong.com

As the CEO and chairman of the Cabot Advisory Group, LLC, Steven M. Darien offers human resources management advice to businesses of all sizes. A fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources, Steven M. Darien brings more than 30 years of experience to his position. In his time away from work, Mr. Darien enjoys staying active by swimming.

One of the first things novice swimmers learn is how to tread water. Treading water can help swimmers conserve energy if something occurs that prevents them from swimming, such as exhaustion or an injury.

To tread water, your body should be vertical, with your head above water. Your torso should remain as still as possible as your arms and legs do the work that keeps you afloat. Maintain a slow and steady breathing rate to conserve energy.

Spread your arms out to the side and move them backward and forward, with your palms pointing in the direction of movement each time. Moving your arms up and down wastes energy and causes you to bob up and down in the water.

Instead of kicking your legs, rotate them in opposite directions like an eggbeater. As one leg rotates outward, the other should be rotating inward. Mastering this technique takes practice but will save a great deal of energy.

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Three Tips for Warming Up Before You Swim

 

Warming Up pic

Warming Up
Image: active.com

With over 30 years of experience helping companies to manage human resources and organizational design, Steven M. Darien works as the chairman and CEO of the Cabot Advisory Group, LLC. Outside of his professional life, Steven M. Darien enjoys swimming.

Whether you are swimming competitively or just having fun, properly warming up will help ensure your safety, while also helping you get the most from your swim. Follow these three tips to help you prepare for your swim.

1. Use Swimming Fin s– Fins do a lot more of the work than your bare feet could, helping your arms slowly acclimate to swimming. According to the Somerset Valley YMCA’s director of swimming, Matthew Donovan, using flippers while you warm up can help prevent shoulder injury. Donovan claims he has not seen a single major shoulder injury in 13 years at the YMCA, attributing this statistic to swimmers warming up with flippers.

2. Start on Land – Before you even dip your toes in the water, consider stretching and warming up on land. Stretches and light cardio exercises such as jumping jacks or jogging help increase your blood flow, enabling you to swim more effectively and with less risk of injury.

3. Warm Up Mentally – Your body is not the only thing that benefits from a warm up. Preparing your mind for your swim helps ensure you retain any new information you learn. Mental preparation allows you to keep your head in the game, staying focused on your swim. Before you start your swim, take a moment to collect your thoughts. Breathe deeply and relax, letting go of or setting aside anything that might be distracting you.